vhxtv

vhxtv:

Please join us and send your thoughts to the FCC now. The deadline is this Friday, July 18. For more background on net neutrality, read this Atlantic article. Below is a letter sent to the FCC by our CEO.

Hi,

I’m the co-founder and chief executive of VHX, a small NYC-based startup that allows anyone to sell videos online. We enable individuals and small businesses to reach customers they couldn’t reach before, and provide them with a high-quality video streaming experience that’s on par with large, closed platforms like iTunes and Netflix.

Buffering and delivery speed are absolutely critical to any company working with online video. As a company, VHX will live and die based on the quality of our product and our video-watching experience. The success we’ve had to-date is entirely because we can compete solely on the basis of that product, in an open market, enabled by an open Internet. Our business, and the small busineses we support, would be gravely impacted by paid prioritization, technical discrimination and/or access fees.

The companies with which we compete – Apple, Amazon, Google, the cable companies themselves – can afford to pay for a “fast lane” or fight a vague “commercially reasonable” standard. We do not have that luxury. We do not have lawyers on staff, and we do not have the resources to negotiate individualized deals. If the rules around net neutrality are too soft, we would not be able to match our competitors experience, and we would not be able to survive.

Chairman Wheeler has been outspoken about his support for net neutrality and an open Internet, but the critical question now is about how it’s implemented. I cannot stress enough how much we need strict, simple, “bright-line” rules, which leave no room for exploitation and misinterpretation. Lawyers I trust have told me repeatedly that these kind of bright-line rules can only be enacted if broadband providers are reclassified as public utilities under Title II. Rules based on Section 706 leave room for the kind of challenges and uncertainty that stifle investment, create chilling effects for startups, and threaten innovation.

Thanks,
@jamiew

It’s very frustrating to make something and nobody notices it. If you put on a play and nobody comes to it, did you really put on a play? But you just keep going. You remind yourself that people have been doing this as long as there have been people. And your frustrations and disappointments are nothing new. And you go back to the wheel.
humansofnewyork
humansofnewyork:

"I’ve had a lot of magic in my life."
“Tell me something magic.”
“When they were young, my parents met an American couple in a sunday school in Shanghai. Over the years, they kept running into this same couple, as they traveled through different parts of the world. So they jokingly made a pact that their firstborn children would be married. Then my parents had me, and the other couple had a son. I didn’t meet the man until late in life, when I was already deeply in love with another man. But I fell in love with him and we got married.”
“Wow, that is cool.”
“That’s not even the craziest part. Want to hear the craziest part?”
“Absolutely.”
“My husband had three previous engagements. And the morning we met, he was cooking three eggs, and each of them had double yolks.”

humansofnewyork:

"I’ve had a lot of magic in my life."
“Tell me something magic.”
“When they were young, my parents met an American couple in a sunday school in Shanghai. Over the years, they kept running into this same couple, as they traveled through different parts of the world. So they jokingly made a pact that their firstborn children would be married. Then my parents had me, and the other couple had a son. I didn’t meet the man until late in life, when I was already deeply in love with another man. But I fell in love with him and we got married.”
“Wow, that is cool.”
“That’s not even the craziest part. Want to hear the craziest part?”
“Absolutely.”
“My husband had three previous engagements. And the morning we met, he was cooking three eggs, and each of them had double yolks.”